Tag Archives: cosmos kids

Pops Tops: Top 11 Releases of 2011 (#4-7)

#7: The Runnies-You Can’t Win LP

Perfect musical accompaniment for a haunted house or dingy dive bar,You Can’t Win is full of ominous, organ-heavy rock and roll. The way singer Mary McKane growls all over this record, I found myself constantly being reminded of the Whigs and fellow windy city spook poppers Hollows.

#6: Cosmos Kids-Volume 1 Lp

Cosmos Kids, like the Laureattes, wear their influences on their sleaves, though Cosmos Kids may wear theirs more boldly and proudly. Listen to album closer, “Saying Goodbye” or “Fight for your Love” for proof that this band has a very real knowledge of and love for the early days of rock and roll.

#5: The Laureattes-Spells LP

Last year, the Laureates smittened me with their EP, No Kontrol, so much so that I named it one of the 5 best releases of last year. On Spells, the guys may have opted to ditch the heavily distorted vocals, but have kept the Britpop sensibilities that hooked me in tact. It’s not surprising this LP was recorded during the same year the band also recorded a year’s worth of covers from bands like the Yardbirds, Stones, and Troggs. Spells, much like it’s predecessor shows no qualms about wearing its British Invasion influences on its sleaves.

#4: Narrow Sparrow-Synthworks EP

On Synthworks, Narrow Sparrow’s debut EP, the group has perfectly married early 60s sock hoppery with modern electronics. This 4-song EP combines theramins, sythns, drum machines, and pretty melodies to create what, to me, is the musical equivalent to an Edgar Rice Burroughs novel.

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The Cosmos Kids: “Fight For Your Love”

The Cosmos Kids know a truth about rock ‘n’ roll that’s sparing in much of today’s music: less is most definitely more. “Fight for your Love” is the proof. 7 words drive this tune, “No I won’t fight for your love.” You might be inclined to think this is some obscure early 60s cover with its attention to the details of yesterday’s formula. “Twist and Shout” chord progression? Check. Handclaps at the bridge? Check. Simplistic lyrics over poetry? Check. The only thing that kicks this song into modern times is the vocal distortion, which I’m sure is the result of several Strange Boys binges.

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